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Winterizing Crochet Scarves Pt 2: Dr Who style

A couple of months ago, I wrote a post about wanting to winterize crocheted scarves.  Crochet tends to create a fairly open weave, especially if you’re using longer stitches (double crochets, treble crochets, etc) so it isn’t always the warmest it could be, regardless if you’re using natural fibres such as wool or alpaca.
I wanted to try sewing a layer of fleece or some other fabric to the back of my scarves for added warmth.
Yesterday, I finally did it!

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Fleece backing sewn to a crocheted Dr Who scarf

It’s an exciting project for two reasons.  One is because I finally tried my winterizing idea.  Two is because the scarf in question is a Dr Who scarf!  Who can’t be excited about that! 🙂 Continue reading Winterizing Crochet Scarves Pt 2: Dr Who style

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Winterizing scarves

December 13, 2015: Winterized my first crocheted scarf!  Finally!  A Dr Who scarf.  A dalek on one side, a Tardis on the other and fleece backing for extra warmth!
So, I have had a thought…and it has been bouncing around in my head for over a week now which suggests to me that it’s a good thought and should be acted on.
Many of you know that I make scarves, skull scarves specifically.  They are crocheted and whether I use large or small hooks, the one problem I find with traditional crochet is that it doesn’t create a solid fabric. Each stitch stands alone with a bit of space between it and the next stitch, which allows for air flow.
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Tunisian crochet or knit fabrics are denser but the nature of the skull scarf pattern is such that it requires traditional stitching, so one could argue that they aren’t as warm as they could be. (Especially around the actual skulls which are effectively big holes in the fabric!)
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In certain weather and during certain seasons this wouldn’t be a concern, but I live in Canada and in the middle of February you want a scarf that will block all manner of frigid air currents.
This brings me to my idea.
I’m going to try to winterize my scarves by adding a second layer, perhaps a layer of fleece, to them.
Sewing fabric to a crocheted piece is going to be challenging but I’m up for it! 🙂
Now I have to figure out the best way to attach two pieces of different fabric. Which stitch to use? Machine sew or hand sew?
If anyone has any suggestions, I’m all ears!
December 13, 2015: Winterized my first crocheted scarf!  Finally!  A Dr Who scarf.  A dalek on one side, a Tardis on the other and fleece backing for extra warmth!

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Asymmetry and Variegated Yarn – Interesting Dichotomy

I have spent a lot of time looking for asymmetrical crochet patterns online and I have a pretty good library now of possibilities.  Not sure why but such shapes are more pleasing to my eye than the typical triangular shawls…as much as I like making those!
Most recently, I have also learned that asymmetry affects the resulting variegation from dyed yarn…unexpected, but makes sense.
A few weeks ago, I was on the hunt for a new pattern.  I wanted something easy and brainless.  A pattern I could memorize and work on in the car, while travelling, or while relaxing and watching the last season of House.
This one fit the bill!
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So easy to make! A simple sc/ch/ch/sc repetition that created a gorgeous and dense (almost knit-like) fabric. I used a sock yarn, Blue Faced Leicester and nylon blend, which I chose due to the gorgeous popping colours!
What I didn’t realize was that the variegation would slowly change due to the increasing width of the body of the scarf.  You can see the change in the above picture.  The initial tail (top of pic) has some very short, repetitious strips of colour.  They start to fan out slightly until they culminate in three large spots in the middle.  From there, the variegation thins out even more and takes on a more edgy, jagged striping pattern.
Worth noting for future projects….asymmetry will affect the variegated results.
Overall, I continue to quite like the result.  It’s chic and classy!
Oh, and it’s up in my Etsy shop 🙂
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A wrap, a cowl, a scarf, a hood…Couldn't decide. So I made them all…

This week has been amazing!  And humbling.
And absolutely chock FULL of crochet and knitting!
Last week I kicked off a Facebook campaign for Stitch Noir.  I didn’t know if it would make much of a difference but I figured it couldn’t hurt.
In the last 6 days, my page likes have tripled!  Very unexpected and humbling.  So many nice comments, not to mention people sharing my photos and my albums.  Never in my wildest dreams did I expect such a reaction!
If nothing else, it has inspired me to keep working on patterns.  Altering them and making them my own.  I discovered some software that allows me to create crochet charts so I have been trying to learn the ins and outs…plus I have been trying to create stock for my Etsy store….but although I have SO many ideas, I only have two hands and sadly only 24 hours in a day.
Next up, we are headed up to the family farm for around a week.  Cows, pigs, chickens, horses and SHEEP! My plan is to use up every sunny day sitting out on a hay bale, scratching the ears of Claire (the lamb who loves scritches! 🙂 and crocheting.  Well, perhaps I’ll also find time to take out my bicycle!
I’m pretty certain I’ll also find time to take pictures.
For now, I’ll leave you with the gallery below.  This is the project I completed today: A Skull Cowl that is multi-talented and can be used as a hood, a cowl and a scarf 🙂  This pattern has received quite a bit of attention on FB.  It is meant to be a multi-tasking accessory…thus the description in my shop:
“Imagine an air conditioned theatre. It’s not cold outside so your shoulders are bare, but inside….well BRRRR! If you’re wearing this lovely cowl around your neck, you simply pull it down over your shoulders. 
Driving when it’s chilly outside…but driving with a bulky jacket on is annoying…throw the coat in the back and pull your skull cowl down over your arms. 🙂
Unexpected precipitation? Pull this lovely cowl up over your head and you have a lovely hood!
I love this piece. Dressy or casual…can be made with or without a skull. Perfect for those moments when you’re chilled but aren’t going to put on a bunch of layers!”
It’s a pretty straightforward pattern to create and credit must be given to both Kungen O. Majkis for the skull inspiration and Lorene Haythorn Eppolite for the Zola cowl pattern.
I’m pleased with how it turned out and already have another three planned and yarn purchased for each.
Back to limited number of hands and hours in a day.  So frustrating! 😉